Healthy Living Blog

Looking for ways to fight Colds and Flu symptoms in the Fall? The 5 essentials everyone should have in their natural medicine cabinet!

Posted by on Sep 28, 2016 in Blog | 0 comments

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Looking for ways to fight Colds and Flu symptoms in the Fall?

Here are 5 essentials everyone should have in their natural medicine cabinet!

Here are!

It’s that time of year where the leaves are changing colour, nights are getting colder and parents and kids are back to school… and we all know what that means: colds and flu season!!

Keep you and your family’s immune system boosted and effectively fight those pesky infections with these 5 must haves in the house:

  1. Vitamin C– start taking these antioxidants as soon as September hits! A daily dose of 1000mg for adults and 500mg for kids can go a long way in helping to prevent illness and keep your immune system strong.
  1. Vitamin D3– as many of my patients know, the importance of vitamin D3 is extensive and we stop making it as soon as the cool weather hits. Keeping your levels up is essential for immune health, bone strength and mood during the long winter months. Daily low dose of 2000IU for adults and 1000IU for kids keeps everyone feeling their best!

ND Tip: I highly recommend the liquid forms of vitamin D3: 1 drop is 1000IU and it’s tasteless which makes for easy and convenient dosing for both you and your kids!

  1. Probiotics– did you know majority of our immune cells are found in our gut? This is why it is so important to keep our digestive tracks happy and regularly replenish the healthy bacteria probiotics provide. 1 probiotic capsule daily for both adults and kids is enough to keep your gut and immune system strong!
  1. Deep Immune by St Francis – this herbal combination is my go to for many teachers, parents and kids who typically come down with a cold as soon as school starts! Not only does it keep your immune system boosted to prevent opportunistic bacteria but it also helps with our stress response. It comes in a children and adult formula and can be started the last week of summer.

Note: this formula is NOT to be used during colds and flus, it is an immune boosting formula and only for prevention.

  1. Echinacea– this is the best choice DURING colds and flus and is safe and effective for the whole family and even during pregnancy! At the first sign of a sore throat, sinus congestion or cough start fighting it off before it gets worse. There are a number of Echinacea products that come in different forms and doses. Echinaseal by St Francis has herbal liquid formulas for both adults and kids while Mediherb Echinacea is a tablet form for adults.

Finding the right natural treatment for you and your kids based on individual specific needs is what naturopathic doctors do best! If you find you suffer from chronic infections (eg. sinusitis, strep throat or bronchitis) and are constantly taking antibiotics, ask me about the safe, effective and natural solutions that can work for you. In the meantime, keep these 5 essential items handy and part of your regular immune boosting routine to help prevent and fight off Fall infections.

5-cold-and-flu-essentials

Pain-Proof Your Commute – 6 Practical Tips to Reduce Driving Stress

Posted by on Sep 28, 2016 in Blog | 0 comments

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Being on Centre Street allows me to see the morning rush up the hill, as commuters leave town for work. Mount Albert (and surrounding areas) is most certainly a commuter town, and lamented by our clients the average commute for us East Gwillers tend to range anywhere between 30 minutes to an hour and a half, one-way. Stats Canada reveals that the average one-way commute time for Torontonians is 30-45 minutes, so we are clocking in more time in our cars. That can have a damaging effect on the spine, as being immobilized puts a lot of pressure in through the muscles and back and on the spine.

Did you know that truck drivers have the highest case of low back disc herniations? Disc herniation is a type of spinal problem that can lead to pain that starts in the back and can radiate down the legs, sometimes all the way to the feet.  I see these types of aches all the time in my practice: People who commute a lot come in with shoulder ache and tension, back pain, numbness and/or tingling into their legs or arms, and headaches. Recently I was on a local television show talking about how to prevent these driving-related pains. Here are my top tips:

Tilt your mirror up. Moving your mirror slightly upwards forces you to look up and sit straighter. Imagine a straight line going down your ear, shoulder and hips – that’s good seated posture!

Raise your seat up. If it is too far back, you are holding your body up as opposed to using the backrest to support you. Raise it to a point where you can roll your back into it so your shoulder blades are actually touching your seat. Not only is this a better position for your posture, it’s safer: if you get into an accident there’s less chance for your head to snap back, causing whip lash.

Adjust your hands on the steering wheel. Most people have their hands locked in an 11 o’clock and 1 o’clock position. Better bet: move your hands down to 10 and 2 o’clock with elbows pointing downwards. In this position, you’re not holding your shoulders up and fatiguing all the muscles in the shoulders and upper back.

Pack a pool noodle. Summer may be over but you can still use those pool noodles year round in your car, here’s how: cut one in half and place it across the small of your back just above your belt line to create a lumbar support. This will create a small arch on your back, taking the pressure off the discs while also engaging different muscles. However don’t leave the noodle there for too long because the body is not used to being in that position; Every 15 minutes, put it in for 2 minutes max.

 No noodle? Use a tennis ball. If you have a have burning ache in the shoulders or low back, place the ball on the sore spot and gentle roll back and forth across the muscles. This will loosen up the muscle and increase circulation there. It’s not a cure but will help alleviate some of the stress.

Sniff your armpits at red lights. It sounds silly but there’s nothing funny about it. Move your nose towards your underarm and hold it there for at least 10 seconds each armpit. This stretches out the muscles, which anchor your head to your shoulders.

Give these easy tips a go next time you’re behind the wheel. But how do you know if your aches and pains are attributed to your commute? Well, if you find that you have to turn your whole body to check your blind spot, it’s probably time to see your chiropractor.

 

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Looking for ways to fight Colds and Flu symptoms in the Fall? The 5 essentials everyone should have in their natural medicine cabinet!

Posted by on Sep 28, 2016 in Blog | 0 comments

5-cold-and-flu-essentials-drchad-blog-website-banner-template-banner-600x250

Looking for ways to fight Colds and Flu symptoms in the Fall?

Here are 5 essentials everyone should have in their natural medicine cabinet!

Here are!

It’s that time of year where the leaves are changing colour, nights are getting colder and parents and kids are back to school… and we all know what that means: colds and flu season!!

Keep you and your family’s immune system boosted and effectively fight those pesky infections with these 5 must haves in the house:

  1. Vitamin C– start taking these antioxidants as soon as September hits! A daily dose of 1000mg for adults and 500mg for kids can go a long way in helping to prevent illness and keep your immune system strong.
  1. Vitamin D3– as many of my patients know, the importance of vitamin D3 is extensive and we stop making it as soon as the cool weather hits. Keeping your levels up is essential for immune health, bone strength and mood during the long winter months. Daily low dose of 2000IU for adults and 1000IU for kids keeps everyone feeling their best!

ND Tip: I highly recommend the liquid forms of vitamin D3: 1 drop is 1000IU and it’s tasteless which makes for easy and convenient dosing for both you and your kids!

  1. Probiotics– did you know majority of our immune cells are found in our gut? This is why it is so important to keep our digestive tracks happy and regularly replenish the healthy bacteria probiotics provide. 1 probiotic capsule daily for both adults and kids is enough to keep your gut and immune system strong!
  1. Deep Immune by St Francis – this herbal combination is my go to for many teachers, parents and kids who typically come down with a cold as soon as school starts! Not only does it keep your immune system boosted to prevent opportunistic bacteria but it also helps with our stress response. It comes in a children and adult formula and can be started the last week of summer.

Note: this formula is NOT to be used during colds and flus, it is an immune boosting formula and only for prevention.

  1. Echinacea– this is the best choice DURING colds and flus and is safe and effective for the whole family and even during pregnancy! At the first sign of a sore throat, sinus congestion or cough start fighting it off before it gets worse. There are a number of Echinacea products that come in different forms and doses. Echinaseal by St Francis has herbal liquid formulas for both adults and kids while Mediherb Echinacea is a tablet form for adults.

Finding the right natural treatment for you and your kids based on individual specific needs is what naturopathic doctors do best! If you find you suffer from chronic infections (eg. sinusitis, strep throat or bronchitis) and are constantly taking antibiotics, ask me about the safe, effective and natural solutions that can work for you. In the meantime, keep these 5 essential items handy and part of your regular immune boosting routine to help prevent and fight off Fall infections.

5-cold-and-flu-essentials

Essentials of Running; A Naturopathic Approach

Posted by on May 27, 2016 in Blog | 0 comments

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I’m very exciting to be participating in the Mount Albert Sports Day 5Km Run this year and in anticipation I wanted to share some valuable information on the important components involved in long distance running.  When you break it down it’s simple: how we treat and feed our bodies is what determines how well it will perform and recover after exercise.

Stretch

During activity our muscles are constantly contracting and shortening in order to perform the movements we desire.  Without regular stretching, these muscles continue to shorten and tighten which often leads to pain, restricted movement and hinders posture.  Taking the time to stretch before and after activity can help prevent injury, improve flexibility and benefit our muscles and joints.

Hydration & Electrolytes

As we all know, proper hydration is essential in the maintenance of good health.  For a long distance runner, a minimum of 2L of pure filtered water is necessary every day.  A trick is to drink water throughout the day.

Long distance runners lose considerable minerals and important electrolytes through sweat while running making it important to replenish them. Deficiency of minerals can lead to muscle cramps, weakness, dizziness and joint issues.

ND Tip: Replenish your electrolytes DURING your run… Try my awesome Homemade Powerade recipe below!

Nutrition

  • Never run on an empty stomach!
  • Eat breakfast first thing in the morning or a minimum 1 hour before a run.
  • Focus on eating complex carbohydrates and proteins in order to provide the instant fuel your body needs before a run.
  • Within 2 hour window of exercise eat a high protein meal.
  • Choose live whole foods to get the most vitamins and nutrients out of your diet. Eg. raw or lightly steamed dark leafy greens at every meal gets you the most essential vitamins and minerals.

Complex Carbohydrates:

  • sweet potato & yams
  • brown and wild rice
  • spinach
  • broccoli
  • beans
  • zucchini
  • lentils
  • whole grains

Fiber

Daily recommended amount:

  • 25g for women
  • 40g for men
  • Choosing complex carbohydrates and increasing fruits and vegetables in your diet will ensure you get adequate fiber. Supplementation may also be beneficial.

High Sources of Protein:

  • Chicken & turkey breast
  • fish (salmon, tuna, halibut)
  • lean beef, pork, veal
  • tofu, soybeans
  • eggs
  • dairy (Greek yogurt)
  • nuts and seeds

Proper Footwear

Picking the right shoes that work with your body movement and posture ensures you are properly supporting your knees, spine and neck during a run.  If you’re having pain in these areas, it may be time to look into new shoes.

ND Tip: have your gait and feet measured at a professional shoe store to find the right pair of shoes for you!

Recovery

Recovery is more than just stretching, it is about nourishing and healing your body after strenuous exercise in order to limit pain and avoid chronic injury.  Hydrotherapy, the therapeutic use of water, is a very effective way the help reduce inflammation and pain in the body, relax muscles and bring nutrients via blood to necessary areas.

ND Tip: Try an Epsom Salt Soak- 20-30 minute soak in a hot bath with 1 heaping cup of Epsom salts after your run.  Boost the relaxation effect by adding calming essential oils such as lavender or eucalyptus to your bath.

Electrolyte Drink- Your homemade Powerade

In 500ml water add:

  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tbsp maple syrup or honey
  • Juice of a lemon
  • Toss in some ice cubes to keep it cold

It is essential to drink this during or after your run as you lose electrolytes!

Oh Baby! Chiropractic Benefits Babies

Posted by on May 26, 2016 in Blog | 0 comments

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Is there something in our town’s water? Because there seems to be a baby boom happening! In addition to my wife being pregnant with our first child, I am seeing pregnant bellies everywhere and a spike in mothers bringing in their newborns and babies into the clinic for holistic care for a gamut of baby-specific issues.

Surprised? Many people are when they find out that chiropractic can benefit babies as young as a few hours old. More typically in my practice, parents bring in babies who are a few weeks or months old. Recently Rebekah brought her 4-week old son to see me for reflux relief. Rebekah says, “After the first couple treatments we noticed a big difference in him. He wasn’t spitting up as much, sleeping better and overall happier. We would bring any of our children back in a heartbeat for the results and a happy baby!”

It’s very common to treat both mom and baby in one visit, since the mother (especially new moms during the very exhausting “fourth trimester”) often suffers from shoulder and hip pain from carrying the baby, breastfeeding, and sleeping in awkward positions. That was the case with Linda, a first time mother, who brought along her 10-month old son to her own appointment. According to her, “Jensen’s first chiropractic visit was great. He took a 3-hour nap and slept 7-hours straight that day. He is usually a terrible sleeper and napper.”

Now you’re probably wondering if chiropractors apply the same pressure as used on adults. The answer is no. Babies’ spines are obviously more delicate, so treatments (adjustments) are modified for babies and are much gentler. It’s important to note that the main purpose of chiropractic care is not the treatment of conditions or diseases, but rather, a restoration of normal spinal function that reduces stress on the body and enhances overall body function.

So why consider chiropractic care for your baby? The birthing process can cause trauma and strain that can go undetected which can lead to restrictions in the newborn’s spine and can be exacerbated while young babies are learning to navigate their new environment, from sleeping in a crib to holding the head up and being passed around. Babies will fall, tumble, and sit in prolonged postures in car seats and carriers. Although chiropractors are primarily trained to locate and treat misalignment in the spine, many chiropractors and parents have long noticed improvements in some of these common infant conditions.

Colic

According to the Mayo clinic, colic is a frustrating condition marked by predictable periods of significant distress in an otherwise well-fed, healthy baby. Babies with colic often cry more than three hours a day, three days a week for three weeks or longer. Nothing you do to try to help your baby during these episodes seems to bring any relief. One chiropractic theory on the cause of colic is a strain in the neck vertebrae associated with the birthing process, particularly from the use of vacuum and forcep deliveries. When assessing a colicky baby, the vertebrae in the neck is the first place I check.

Constipation

As a general guideline, babies 0 to 4 months of age poop on average of three to four times a day, and after the introduction of solid foods, that reduces to approximately one bowel movement per day. Many times parents will comment that shortly after receiving a chiropractic adjustment, the child will have a bowel movement. Much to the delight of some parents, babies have pooped in their diapers on my table! I don’t mind at all.

Ear infections

One of the most common reasons why parents bring their children to see me is for ear infections, which are very common for children before age two. These infections are caused by fluid buildup behind the eardrum, leading to ear pain and fever. One way chiropractic care could help is by relaxing the muscles and tissues around the ear to allow them to drain naturally.

The next time you feel frazzled by a fussy baby, consider seeing your local family chiropractor.

 

Coconut Curried Noodles With Broccoli

Posted by on May 26, 2016 in Blog | 0 comments

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I don’t know what it is about the combination of curry and noodles together but it screams comfort food to me! Veggie noodle dishes are one of my favourite things to whip up when I need a quick, easy and convenient meal.

This curry noodle dish is 100% nutritionist approved! For those of you with special dietary restrictions feel good knowing that this recipe is gluten, dairy & soy free.

Let’s talk about the flavours though – oh the flavours…SO DARN GOOD! The spiciness from the curry is tamed by the creaminess of the coconut milk and the noodles soak up all of that delicious flavour.

Allow me to boast about the nutritional content of this meal for a moment: Adding broccoli to your meal plan multiple times a week is a fantastic idea because broccoli has been touted for its cholesterol lowering benefits. It’s also a major detox veggie, fibre-rich and packs a serious punch in the Vitamin C department.

About Vitamin C: Because our bodies don’t produce Vitamin C we need to consume it from our daily diet. It’s needed for the production of collagen, used by our body for wound healing, maintaining the health of our mouth, protecting us from free radical damage and helping our body to absorb iron.  

Did you also know that bell peppers are an incredible source of Vitamin C? Another main component in this recipe!

Most people don’t realize that curry powder is actually a combination of spices. One of which is turmeric. It’s turmeric that gives curry that beautiful golden colour. Now, turmeric’s main constituent is curcumin which has a number of significant health benefits. It’s rich in antioxidants and has powerful anti-inflammatory properties.

Coconut Curried Noodles With Broccoli

  • 4 cups cooked flat rice noodles*
  • 1.5 Tbsp St. Francis Coconut Oil & Ghee Cooking Spray (or extra virgin olive oil)
  • 1/2 yellow onion, diced
  • 2 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 2 Tbsp red curry paste (I used Thai Kitchen brand)
  • 1 tsp curry powder
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 3/4 cup organic stock (veggie or chicken is best in this recipe)
  • 1/2 can full fat coconut milk
  • 1/2 bell pepper, diced
  • 1/2 cup frozen peas
  • 2 cups broccoli florets
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • fresh black pepper to taste
  • 3 green onion, thinly sliced
  • *  I buy the traditional vietnamese noodles from my natural health food store. If you’re using regular rice noodle pasta then cook according to package directions.

 Directions

  1. In a large bowl add boiling water to your uncooked rice noodles and allow the rice noodles to sit in this hot water bath for 20 minutes while you prep everything else.
  2. In a large sauté pan over medium heat, warm your oil and then add diced onions and allow them to sauté for 5 minutes or until translucent.
  3. Add minced garlic and sauté for another minute or until fragrant.
  4. Stir in curry paste, curry powder and turmeric and allow spices to cook out for a minute or two before adding in the broth. Simmer on low for 1-2 minutes and then add in the coconut milk. Continue to gently simmer for a few minutes.
  5. Taste curry sauce for seasoning and adjust as needed. At this point I added in my sea salt and fresh black pepper. You may find you don’t need it at all, you may wish to use less than I used or a bit more.
  6. Add veggies to the pan and sauté on low until peppers and broccoli have softened slightly. Don’t over cook your veggies or you’ll destroy the nutrients.
  7. Drain your noodles and give them a quick rinse under cold water. Add them to the pan with the curry sauce and veggies. Allow them to warm through and soak up the flavours from the pan.
  8. Serve and top with sliced green onion.

Prenatal Massage

Posted by on May 26, 2016 in Blog | 0 comments

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Prenatal massage can be very beneficial for a mother-to-be while her body goes through different changes throughout her pregnancy. Prenatal massage differs from regular massage treatments as there are many modifications made to ensure the mother-to-be and baby are safe at all times.

Prenatal massage positions the mother-to-be on their side, or upright supported by pillows for their comfort and safety. A pregnancy pillow may be used allowing the mother-to-be to lay face down with a pillow under her abdomen with an opening for the belly, taking pressure off the abdomen allowing for more added comfort during the massage. Mothers-to-be should ask their doctor if massage therapy is a treatment option for them, especially if the pregnancy is high risk.

Benefits of Prenatal Massage:

  • It helps with discomforts associated with pregnancy: back pain, sciatica, carpal tunnel, sacroiliac/hip pain
  • It increases circulation, providing more oxygen and nutrients throughout the body and to the fetus
  • It helps decrease edema and swelling
  • Increases relaxation; which helps decrease anxiety and depression, helps with hormonal changes, and improves sleep
  • Assists in decreasing muscle tension and increasing flexibility related to postural changes
  • Assists in decreasing muscle spasming and leg cramping
  • Increase overall general well being

What the Puck? – Hockey and Chiroractic

Posted by on Apr 24, 2016 in Blog | 0 comments

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With the NHL playoffs in full swing we’re reminded of how much of a body contact sport hockey really is. It’s no secret that chiropractic care has been proven to help improve hockey players’ strength, endurance and range or motion. Many people in our community – young and old – are invested in the sport of hockey, and part and parcel to this investment is their pre-game training to optimize performance and post-game rehab. My hockey player clients remark that they experience smoother skating, quicker reflexes and more stable balance on the ice.

stanleycup13_playoffs_english1While the hazards of playing hockey cannot be completely eliminated, the risk of injury can be substantially reduced with proper safety wear such as elbow pads and a helmet. Fortunately the majority of hockey injuries are mild and involve the soft tissues: muscle strains, bruises, ligament tears, and cuts. Below are some of the most common hockey injuries and how chiropractic care can help.

Injury #1: Shoulder

Shoulder separation and a broken collarbone are very common. These injuries occur from direct contact of the shoulder with another player, the boards, or the ice. Treatment can include a sling, rest, physical therapy and in serious cases surgery.  Research published in the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics (JMPT) has shown that chiropractic care can reduce painful symptoms of recurrent shoulder instability related to hockey injuries.

Injury #2: Elbows and Wrists

The point of the elbow is a frequent area of contact, which can result in the development of bursitis. Thick and scarred bursal tissue or tendons in elbow can be a source of recurrent painful inflammation. A fall on the outstretched arm or contact with the boards that forces the wrist up or down may cause a fractures or jam the elbows/shoulder joints. Soft tissue therapy and restoring joint mobility help heal the injuries and prevent recurrent flare-ups.

Injury #3: Back

Low-back pain and/or a pulled muscle are the most common type of injuries that chiropractors treat in general. Hockey players are at risk for low-back injuries due to the flexed (forward) posture of skating and repetitive strain on the pelvic and hip flexors. In addition to regular adjustments on the vertebrae and pelvis, stretching out the hip flexors (psoas muscle) and gluteal muscles plus strengthening the core muscles will help rehabilitate and prevent these injuries.

Injury #4: Hip

The hip joint and groin muscles are susceptible to injury due to the mechanics of the skating stride. Some of the most common soft tissue injuries in hockey players include a groin strain and a hip flexor strain. Off-season strengthening and dedicated stretching before and after practice are important to prevent these injuries. Routine adjustments, massage and acupuncture are excellent treatments for hip and groin injuries.

Injury #5: Knee

Though less common in hockey than in other sports such as soccer and basketball, Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) disruption and meniscus tears (torn cartilage) can also occur. The medial collateral ligament is most susceptible to a sprain because of the leg position—pushing off the inside edge of the skate blade—and contact to the outside of the knee. Knee adjustments help release the built up tension in the knee and restore proper mobility to the joint.

Injury #6: Concussion

Concussions are a major concern for hockey players. You do not need to be “knocked out” to have a concussion. It is important for players, coaches and parents to pay attention for the typical symptoms and signs, which can include “not feeling right” and headache amongst other symptoms. If you suspect a concussive injury the payer should be send for a medical evaluation before returning to play. One of the most overlooked elements of concussions is trauma to the neck. Once the symptoms of a concussion injury dissipates, chiropractic is important for rehabilitating the strain to the neck so that the athlete can return to play sooner than later.

To further optimize performance, incorporating chiropractic care with other wellness modalities like massage therapy and acupuncture can really give an athlete an edge on the ice. Have a hockey kid in the family or do you play in a pickup league? Come into the clinic for an assessment – we would be thrilled to help you up your game!

 

A Time to Heal

Posted by on Apr 24, 2016 in Blog | 0 comments

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In our culture, I find that we are in a rush to do nearly everything. Just fitting in time just do grocery shopping seems an impossibility.  There are times in life when we are forced to slow down, such as when our bodies are injured.  We are not afforded the option of ignoring the pain, or prioritizing it for later.  The body has its own time-frame, and we are not privy to the agenda.

I recently had to undergo surgery, my first question upon waking up was “When can I go back to working out?”.   I was handed a home care sheet which prescribed four weeks of no exercise.  I was astonished that my body would really require so much time, and was in a fair bit of denial that this would really be a thing for me.  It became clear to me after a couple of days at home, that this would indeed be a “thing”.

When thinking on muscle injuries, it is the same thing!  We need to offer the injured part of us some time to heal.  If we keep reintroducing the stress that caused the injury in the first place, it is likely that we will either not heal, or the healing process would take much longer than it could have if we rested!

Does this mean I’m tell you to bed rest?  Absolutely not!  I’m suggesting that you rest the body part that is injured, and give it a break from the activity that caused your injury in the first place; let’s call it relative rest.  Here are some ideas from PainScience.com on how to relatively rest:

Ideas for resting relativelyRest

  • As long as you don’t have a hip or leg injury, walking is surprisingly good and non-stressful exercise.
  • Swimming is one of the most classic options for relative rest. Obviously it’s not completely stressless: you’re not going to want to swim with injured shoulders at all, and the common knee injuries can be a problem. But you can really do alot in the water with minimal risk/stress.
  • Do a “thermal workout” — exhaust yourself with heating and cooling. For example, switch between a hot tub and a swimming pool. (See the thermal workout section in Contrast Hydrotherapy.)
  • Being chilly is another surprisingly exhausting and almost totally passive “workout.” Turn the heat down, put on a T-shirt, and put up with being non-warm for a while.
  • Vigorous breathing is a terrific non-standard workout, with numerous benefits: see The Art of Bioenergetic Breathing.
  • Power yoga can certainly be intense and hard on the body, but often in acompletely different way than most of your other exertions, so it can be a great way to spread the physical stress around.
  • Many people who do not normally strength train in a gym should seriously consider it during rehabilitation, because it is a much better and more efficient way to stay in shape than most people realize, and the precision of gym equipment allows you to easily protect your injury while you heal.

References:

PainSciencecom RSS
https://www.painscience.com/articles/art-of-rest.php

Thai Chicken Balls Recipe

Posted by on Apr 21, 2016 in Blog | 0 comments

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This recipe has been in the works for quite some time. I feel as though I’ve finally perfected it and I’m really excited to share it with all of you because it’s sooo freaking good!!

This meal is loaded with protein and because we’re using almond flour it’s gluten-free too.

Thai Chicken Balls

Yields 10-12 chicken balls

  • 1 lb organic ground chicken
  • 1/2 cup almond meal
  • 1/2 cup yellow onion, finely diced
  • 6 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 Tbsp red curry paste (I used Thai Kitchen brand)
  • 2 Tbsp tamari
  • 1/2 lemon squeezed
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt & black pepper
  • coconut oil (for searing)

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400F.
  2. In a stainless steel mixing bowl, combine ground chicken, almond meal, diced onion, minced garlic, curry paste, tamari, lemon, egg, sea salt & pepper. Combine well. Form mixture into chicken balls. Note: the mixture will seem a bit wet but this is fine – it’ll make for a juicer, tastier chicken ball.
  3. In a large frying pan over medium heat sear the chicken balls in a little coconut oil to get some really nice colour on the outside – you want them golden brown.
  4. Finish the chicken balls off in the oven. Bake them for 8 minutes. Note: If you’re frying pan is oven safe, it can go directly into the oven. Otherwise, transfer the chicken balls to a parchment lined cookie sheet.
  5. Serve with a dipping sauce such as mango chutney or our personal fave, The Thai Kitchen’s Sweet Red Chili Sauce. I serve this up over romaine lettuce with wild rice or sautéed baby bok choy.

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